Winter

Season's readings.

 


 

Winter: Five Windows on the Season

By Adam Gopnik

 

Might "winter" one day become a historical concept rather than an ordinary aspect of the year? Faced with the prospect of global warming, the New Yorker contributor and author of the bestselling Paris to the Moon delivers a stunning meditation on the season, a brilliant evocation of all that we treasure in winter -- and might one day lose.

 


 

The Worst Journey in the World

By Apsley Cherry-Garrard

 

The author served as assistant zoologist on Scott's last, ill-starred expedition to the frozen wasteland that rings the South Pole. Written a decade after he narrowly escaped his leader's fate, Cherry-Garrard's account of Antarctic exploration is gripping, poignant, and not without a bracing humor.

 

 


 

Winter's Tale

By Mark Helprin

 

Build a fire, find a comfortable chair, and lose yourself in Helprin's magical evocation of Belle Epoque New York and the farthest reaches of the imagination. His unlikely love story of a thieving, middle-aged Irishman and a dying young heiress is a transporting tale of breathtaking invention and great beauty.

 

 


 

The Snowflake: Winter's Secret Beauty

By Kenneth Libbrecht

 

A captivating exploration of the art, science, and variety of snowflakes, illustrating, through the author's extraordinary microphotographs, the crystalline intricacy of their structure and pattern. With useful tips for snowflake hunters, Libbrecht's book is a delight to look at and learn from.

 


 

The Long Winter  

By Laura Ingalls Wilder

 

Amid howling winds, freezing temperatures, and blizzard after brutal blizzard, the Little House family -- hunkered down in one room with dwindling supplies of food and fuel -- persevere with a little help from Pa's fiddle, Ma's improvisational cooking, and a lot of hope. Ages 8 and up, and perfect for a family read-aloud.

April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.