The Holiday Spirit

Season's Readings.

 


 

Rock Crystal

By Adalbert Stifter

 

Among the most unusual, moving, and memorable of Christmas stories, this unforgettable parable, written in 1853, transports the reader to the heart of the Alps to share the mystical journey of two children who lose their way in a snowstorm on Christmas Eve. Deceptively simple, yet grand as the landscape it describes.

 

 

 

 

 


 

A Christmas Carol

By Charles Dickens, illustrated by P. J. Lynch

 

For more than 160 years, Dickens’s tale of the miser Ebenezer Scrooge and his conversion to generosity -- through the ministrations of the ghosts of Christmas Past, Christmas Present, and Christmas Yet to Come -- has shaped our understanding of the true meaning of holiday cheer. But have you ever read the original?

 

 

 

 


 

Santa Calls

By William Joyce

 

When young Art Atchinson Aimesworth -- inventor, crime-fighter, and all-around whiz kid -- is summoned by Santa to the North Pole, adventures abound. Told with exuberance and affection, this beautiful picture book about siblings, friendship, and big-heartedness is a delightfully nourishing holiday fantasy.

 

 


 

The Physics of Christmas

By Roger Highfield

 

How does a snowflake form? Can reindeer fly? Was the Star of Bethlehem really a comet? Why is Rudolph’s nose so red? Readers of all ages can learn the answers to these questions and more in this amusing volume in which a physicist imparts real scientific knowledge as he explores the festive lore of Christmas. Great fun.

 

 

 

 


 

The Night Before Christmas

By Clement Clarke Moore, pop-up by Robert Sabuda

 

In this masterful volume that brings Clement Clarke Moore’s classic verses to three-dimensional life, ‘tis a “Night Before” like never ‘twas before. Pop-up book pioneer Sabuda’s meticulously engineered, dazzling white paper forms practically leap off the richly-hued backgrounds with each turn of the page. A holiday treasure.

 

 

April 23: " 'A job,' the woman repeated again, smiling, as if I hadn't heard her. 'Would you like one?' "

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangledeshi mathematician and the haunting crime he's committed barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and ravaged Afghanistan with vinegar-steeped prose recalling the best of George Orwell and Joseph Conrad.

The People's Platform

Why is the Internet - once touted as the democratizer of the future - ruled by a few corporate giants, while countless aspirants work for free? Astra Taylor diagnoses why the web has failed to be a utopian playing field, and offers compelling ways we can diversify the marketplace and give voice to the marginalized.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.