Tennis

Literary power serves

 


 

The Rivals: Chris Evert vs. Martina Navratilova
Their Epic Duels and Extraordinary Friendship

By Johnette Howard

 

Sixty times these two women met in one championship or another over the course of 16 years. Through extensive interviews with Evert and Navratilova, Johnette Howard unveils the emotion and intensity—on and off the court—at the core of one of sports' greatest rivalries and friendships.

 

 

 

 


 

Levels of the Game

By John McPhee

 

Pulitzer Prize winner and longtime New Yorker writer McPhee obsessively follows an epic 1968 match between Arthur Ashe and Clark Graebner, stroke by emotional stroke. The result brings historical and cultural context to every swing of the racket, and serves up a devastating analysis of the competitive mind at work.

 

 

 


 

A Terrible Splendor:
Three Extraordinary Men, a World Poised for War,
and the Greatest Tennis Match...

By Marshall Jon Fisher

 

Sports and politics collided when American Don Budge and German Gottfried von Cramm faced off at Wimbledon in 1937. Von Cramm disdained the ruling Nazi Party—and therefore his own survival depended on winning match after match. A Terrible Splendor unfolds the dire consequences that followed when the ace finally stumbled on the court.

 

 

 


 

Open: An Autobiography

By Andre Agassi

 

Agassi hates playing tennis—and always has. You would, too, if you had the maniacal dad Agassi writes about. But Agassi learned that he didn't need to love playing to do his job. Along the way, he tried meth, divorced Brooke Shields, wore a hairpiece, and became one of the defining players of his era.

 

 

 

 


 

Strokes of Genius: Federer, Nadal,
and the Greatest Match Ever Played
 

By L. Jon Wertheim

 

In the 2008 Wimbledon men's finals, five-time winner Roger Federer stepped onto the court against Spain's Rafael Nadal and played what some consider to be one of the finest tennis matches of all time. Sports Illustrated senior writer Wertheim gives readers the point-by-point account in all of its surprising dimensions.

 

 

July 22: On this day in 1941, on his twelfth wedding anniversary, Eugene O'Neill presented the just-finished manuscript of Long Day's Journey into Night to his wife, Carlotta.

Crime fiction legends Dennis Lehane and Michael Connelly discuss the new book that unites their beloved sleuths Patrick Kenzie and Harry Bosch.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
The Hundred-Year House

When a poetry scholar goes digging through the decrepit estate of his wife's family to uncover a bygone arts colony's strange mysteries, he awakens a tenacious monster: his mother-in-law. A wickedly funny take on aging aristocracies from author Rebecca Makkai (The Borrower).

Watching Them Be

What makes a film actor into a larger-than-life movie star? James Harvey's passionate, freewheeling essays explain why there are some faces (from Greta Garbo's to Samuel L. Jackson's) from which we cannot look away.

Landline

What if you called up the spouse on the verge of leaving you -- and instead found yourself magically talking to his younger self, the one you first fell for?  Rainbow Rowell, author of the YA smash Eleanor & Park, delivers a sly, enchanting take on 21st-century love.