• DRAWN TO READ

Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power

A look at how the American soldier went from revolutionary musketeer to global cop.

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  • DRAWN TO READ

The 12 Days of Drawn to Read

Ward Sutton doles out a dozen cartoon takes on the year in reading.

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  • Drawn to Read

Ilustrado

Ward Sutton's illustrated review of Miguel Syuco's dazzling new tale of an author's mysterious death.

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  • Drawn to Read

Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition

Ward Sutton's illustrated review of Daniel Okrent's new history of America's singular experiment in mass sobriety.

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Beatrice and Virgil

Ward Sutton on Yann Martel's intriguing follow-up to Life of Pi, in which a writer wrestles with a seemingly impossible subject.

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  • Drawn to Read

Love in Mid Air

A debut novel follows a married woman's affair with a man she meets while traveling -- and raises questions about love, sex, and commitment in an age of missed connections.

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  • Drawn to Read

Father Knows Books: Princess Hyacinth

"Father Knows Books" returns to cast a cartoonist's (and parent's) eye over a new book for children, about a royal family and an uplifting scenario.

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Americans in Paris

Ward Sutton reviews Charles Glass's new history of how American citizens survived, resisted, collaborated, and sometimes died during the Nazi occupation of the French capital.

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The Letters of Vincent Van Gogh

Ward Sutton looks at a new annotated and illustrated edition of the letters from one of the most famously tormented personalities in the history of painting.

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  • drawn to read

Father Knows Books: Otis

In a new visual review feature from Ward Sutton, the cartoonist (and parent) looks at Loren Long's new book Otis. Read more...

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Last Night in Twisted River

In the latest novel from John Irving, a father and son are on the run from a Javert-like pursuer.

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The Wild Things

Dave Eggers makes a novel out of Maurice Sendak's classic picture story. An illustrated review by Ward Sutton.

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Behind the Laughs

Ward Sutton's Illustrated review of I'm Dying Up Here: Heartbreak and High Times in Stand-Up Comedy's Golden Era

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Inherent Vice

Ward Sutton's illustrated review of Pynchon's trip into detective fiction.

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About the Columnist
Ward Sutton’s cartoons and illustrations have appeared in the Village Voice, TV Guide, Rolling Stone, Time, Esquire, The New Yorker, and on the Op-Ed page of the New York Times.

Ward's Drawn to Read appears monthly in the Barnes & Noble Review. Click here to see the complete Drawn to Read archive.

April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.