Spring 2012 Discover pick Suzzy Roche Upstairs at the Square with Lucy Wainwright Roche

Dear Reader,

 

Barnes & Noble's Upstairs at the Square event series pairs writers with musicians for an evening of words and music at our flagship store in Manhattan's Union Square. Sherman Alexie, Elizabeth Gilbert, Gary Shteyngart, and Nick Hornby are just a few of the Discover alums who've participated in this unique series since it began in 2006. Here's the January 26th show with Suzzy Roche, her daughter Lucy Wainwright Roche, and host Katherine Lanpher.

 

 

Cheers, Miwa

 


Miwa Messer

Miwa Messer is the Director of the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers program, which was established in 1990 to highlight works of exceptional literary quality that might otherwise be overlooked in a crowded book marketplace. Titles chosen for the program are handpicked by a select group of our booksellers four times a year. Click here for  submission guidelines.

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