Displaying articles for: September 2013

American Milestones

October 1: "Main Street is the climax of civilization. That this Ford car might stand in front of the Bon Ton Store, Hannibal invaded Rome and Erasmus wrote in Oxford cloisters."

 

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Fighting Indifference

September 30: "After the war we reassured ourselves that it would be enough to relate a single night in Treblinka, to tell of the cruelty, the senselessness of murder, and the outrage born of indifference:"

 

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Norman Invasion

September 28: "Three horses were killed under him and fell. Three times he sprang to the ground undaunted, and avenged without delay the loss of his steed."

 

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Unhappy Endings

September 27: "…But after I got them to leave and shut the door and turned off the light it wasn't any good. It was like saying good-by to a statue. After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain."

 

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Art and Freedom

September 26: "There are five things that societies do: They reproduce; they produce food; they organize themselves in terms of law; they organize themselves in terms of belief; and they make art."

 

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Shel's Billy Sooks

September 25: "You don't have to shoot me…. I will be your rug and I will lie in front of your fireplace and I won't move a muscle and you can sit on me and toast all the marshmallows you want. I love marshmallows."

 

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Fitzgerald's Lament

September 24: "Once one is caught up into the material world not one person in ten thousand finds the time to form literary taste, to examine the validity of philosophic concepts for himself, or to form what, for lack of a better phrase, I might call the wise and tragic sense of life."

 

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Rock That Wall!

September 23: "I'm not here for or against any government. I've come to play rock'n'roll for you, in the hope that one day all the barriers will be torn down…."

 

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Humanity's Challenge

September 21: "For the normal man, as we have him today, his personal unity is a delusion. He is always fighting down the exposure of that delusion."

 

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Over the Edge?

September 20: "Try to picture how they set forth, on ships little larger than fishing smacks, to explore the unknown, to sail they knew not wither, lost in the infinite, ceaselessly in peril, exposed to all the vicissitudes of storm, to every kind of privation."

 

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Eloquent Exit

September 19: "Observe good faith and justice towards all Nations; cultivate peace and harmony with all. Religion and Morality enjoin this conduct;..."

 

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A Newspaper's Credo

September 18: "We shall be Conservative, in all cases where we think Conservatism essential to the public good; -- and we shall be Radical in everything which may seem to us to require radical treatment and radical reform."

 

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Ticket to Fly

September 17: "The ward is a factory for the Combine. It's for fixing up mistakes made in the neighborhoods and in the schools and in the churches, the hospital is."

 

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Mississippi Masters

September 16: "I was born in the great Mississippi Delta, that part of America that someone called the most Southern place on earth."

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Citizen Babbitt

September 14: "He serenely believed that the one purpose of the real-estate business was to make money for George F. Babbitt."

 

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How to Live

September 13: "If you don't know how to die, don't worry; Nature will tell you what to do on the spot, fully and adequately. She will do this job perfectly for you; don't bother your head about it.…"

 

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Speaking American

September 12: "Why doesn't some painstaking pundit attempt a grammar of the American language...? English, that is, as spoken by the great masses of the plain people of this fair land."

 

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Manhattan Moon

September 11: "And as the moon rose higher the inessential houses began to melt away until gradually I became aware of the old island here that flowered once for Dutch sailors' eyes -- a fresh, green breast of the new world..."

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Biologist's Delight

September 10: "I am not insensible to natural beauty, but my emotional joys center on the improbable yet sometimes wondrous works of that tiny and accidental evolutionary twig called Homo sapiens."

 

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Goodman's Warning

September 9: "Every advanced country is overtechnologized; past a certain point, the quality of life diminishes with new 'improvements.' "

 

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Their Finest Hour

September 7: The London Blitz began on this day in 1940 and continued, in the city and throughout the country, for the next eight months. The defiance demonstrated by ordinary citizens throughout England became an inspiration to the nation and its allies.

 

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Thoreau Hits Bedrock

September 6: "If the engine whistles, let it whistle till it is hoarse for its pains. If the bell rings, why should we run?"

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Kerouac's Road

September 5: "It was drizzling and mysterious at the beginning of our journey. I could see that it was all going to be one big saga of the mist."

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Geronimo's Fate

September 4: "We stood between his troopers and my warriors. We placed a large stone on the blanket before us. Our treaty was made by this stone, and it was to last until the stone should crumble to dust; so we made the treaty, and bound each other with an oath…."

 

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Celebrating Douglass

September 3: "When it is finally ours, this freedom, this liberty, this beautiful
and terrible thing, needful to man as air,
usable as earth; when it belongs at last to all..."

 

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Rand's Atlas

September 2: "If you saw Atlas, the giant who holds the world on his shoulders, if you saw that he stood, blood running down his chest,..."

 

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Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.