Displaying articles for: November 2013

Unwholesome Wit

November 30: "It seems a pity that the world should throw away so many good things merely because they are unwholesome."

Read more...

Alcott's Utopia

November 29: "Despite their eccentricity, many of the Fruitlanders' ideas ring bells today. They thought pollution and environmental damage could destroy civilization..."

 

Read more...

Croissants & Coke?

November 28: "I should like to see a bottle of Coca-Cola on every table in England, on every table in France…."

 

Read more...

Inimitable Agee

November 27: "Get a radio or phonograph capable of the most extreme loudness possible, and sit down to listen to a performance of Beethoven's Seventh Symphony..."

 

Read more...

Play It Again

November 26: "There are better movies than Casablanca, but no other movie better demonstrates America's mythological vision of itself -- tough on the outside and moral within..."

 

Read more...

The Art of Science

November 25: "Maybe the thoughts we generate today and flick around from mind to mind…are the primitive precursors of more complicated, polymerized structures that will come later..."

 

Read more...

The Free Word

November 23: "What should ye do then, should ye suppress all this flowery crop of knowledge and new light sprung up and yet springing daily in this city, should ye set an oligarchy of twenty ingrossers over it..."

 

Read more...

"Yes, the President's Shot"

November 22: "There's a rise -- what is now the infamous grassy knoll. As soon as I topped that, a scene of almost unbelievable chaos, even panic..."

 

Read more...

Inventing Edison

November 21: "Who would have guessed that the announcement of the phonograph's invention would be sufficient to propel him in a matter of a few days from obscurity into the firmament above?"

 

Read more...

A Writer's Conscience

November 20: "The writer is of service to humankind only insofar as the writer uses the word even against his or her own loyalties, trusts the state of being..."

 

Read more...

Star-Struck in Nebraska

November 19: "It struck me that Basil couldn't be a name-dropper; these were the people he knew and worked with. It was his world. And oh, God, how I wanted to be a part of it."

 

Read more...

No Thanks, Nobel

November 18: "I can forgive Alfred Nobel for inventing dynamite, but only a fiend in human form could have invented the Nobel Prize."

 

Read more...

The Marcel Wave

November 16: "The vogue has risen into a cult; and the cult, embracing the cultured masses, has deepened into a wave..."

 

Read more...

Faraway Love

November 15: "It is as though I fall into something from which there is no return -- No road back --"

 

Read more...

Driving in Heaven

November 14: "We need a road, or network of roads, where we can drive the way we'll be allowed to drive in heaven after we succumb to apoplexy caused by being stuck for six hours on I-95..."

 

Read more...

Land of Gold

November 13: "Hunger, you would have thought, came out of the east like the sun, and the evening was made of edible gold."

 

Read more...

Founding Couple

November 12: "If we separate from Britain, what code of laws will be established? How shall we be governed so as to retain our liberties?"

 

Read more...

Marines Remember

November 11: "Them landings. I hear them artilleries. That haunts me. The planes were coming over and strafing. I thought they were shooting at us."

 

Read more...

Shining On

November 9: "I would give a thousand of our new lamps for the one, old, battered, but true magical light."

 

Read more...

The Gellhorn Spirit

November 8: "But the only way I can pay back for what fate and society have handed me is to try, in minor totally useless ways, to make an angry sound against injustice…."

 

Read more...

Camus's Dream

November 7: "A man's work is nothing but this slow trek to rediscover, through the detours of art, those two or three great and simple images in whose presence his heart first opened."

 

Read more...

Swept Away

November 6: "As I have already told you, this will not be a war for life, but a war till death between those who have nothing and those who own property..."

 

Read more...

Raking John D.

November 5:  "His instinct for the money opportunity in things was amazing, his perception of the value of seizing this or that particular invention, plant, market, was unerring."

 

Read more...

Cronkite's Secret

November 4:  "I think it's because he looks like everybody's dentist. Both his father and grandfather were dentists, you know."

 

Read more...

O Pioneer!

November 2: "Many dark and sleepless nights have I been a companion for owls, separated from the cheerful society of men, scorched by the Summer's sun, and pinched by the Winter's cold, an instrument ordained to settle the wilderness."

 

Read more...

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

advertisement
Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.