Rand's Atlas

"If you saw Atlas, the giant who holds the world on his shoulders, if you saw that he stood, blood running down his chest, his knees buckling, his arms trembling but still trying to hold the world aloft with the last of his strength, and the greater the effort the heavier the world bore down upon his shoulders -- what would you tell him to do?"


"I...don't know. What...could he do? What would you tell him?"


"To shrug."

--from Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged, which she began writing on this day in 1946; published in 1957, Rand's final novel is regarded as her definitive exploration of her philosophy of "Objectivism"

Daybook is contributed by Steve King, who teaches in the English Department of Memorial University in St. John's, Newfoundland. His literary daybook began as a radio series syndicated nationally in Canada. He can be found online at todayinliterature.com.

 

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