PAGES:
Drawn to Read

Inherent Vice

Ward Sutton's illustrated review of Pynchon's trip into detective fiction.

Read more...

The Speculator

Aging Chrome: Cyberpunks in 2009

These trailblazers of the cyberpunk frontier haven't concluded their explorations. Read more...

Reading Romance

Alpha Allure

Why we're still obsessed with The Leader of the Pack.

Read more...

The Thinking Read

The Philosophical Baby

A new book by Alison Gopnik pulls profound questions out of the minds of babes. Read more...

Reader's Diary

Vision Quests

Visionary conversations with artists David Hockney and Robert Irwin, plus Francis Bacon's messy studio.

Read more...

Library Without Walls

An Iranian Classic

Michael Dirda ventures into the phantasmagoric world of Sadegh Hedayat's The Blind Owl. Read more...

Rock & Roll &

Forty Years of History, Thirty Seconds of Joy

Politics and transcendence in the art of the Congolese soukous. Read more...

Drawn to Read

Life, Inc.

In an illustrated review, Ward Sutton ponders the brand-bound destiny depicted in Douglas Rushkoff's Life, Inc.

Read more...

Reading Romance

Foreign Affairs

In this month's column, tales of love in which cultures clash -- but a richer harmony is the result.

Read more...

Library Without Walls

After the Barbarians: From Gibbon to Auden

How classical scholars have redefined and rediscovered the fascinations of "Late Antiquity." Read more...

Reader's Diary

Pharma Nation

Pharmaceutical malfeasance, media madness, and more.

Read more...

The Thinking Read

Fixing My Gaze

A. C. Grayling on a neuroscientist's attempt to "rewire her own brain." Read more...

Rock & Roll &

Character References

Unearthing the buried pleasures of Serengeti's satirical creations. Read more...

Drawn to Read

The Heyday of the Insensitive Bastards

Ward Sutton's cartoon review finds the groove in Robert Boswell's The Heyday of the Insensitive Bastards.

Read more...

Reading Romance

When Love Crosses the Tracks

The barriers between rich and poor can put a chill on romance -- or urge it to leap overtop.

Read more...

PAGES:

April 18: "[W]ould it be too bold to imagine that all warm-blooded animals have arisen from one living filament…?"

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

advertisement
Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.